Sustaining injuries or experiencing the sudden loss of a loved one as a result of a ride at the Ohio State Fair is a devastating experience for everyone. An amusement ride malfunction, however, means that families may hold its manufacturer, supplier or park operator strictly liable for any harm or wrongful deaths. There is a duty of care to produce and operate a safe ride free of defects.

Passengers have a right to enjoy themselves and go on rides without expecting any harm. Seven individuals were seriously injured and one young man killed when a gondola suddenly broke apart on the Fire Ball ride at the state fair, as reported by WBNS-10TV News. During a summer night in July of 2017, an 18-year-old woman’s life changed catastrophically after suffering a traumatic brain injury while on the Fire Ball ride. She now requires extensive medical treatment and assistance. It is unknown if she will be able to support herself after suffering her severely debilitating injury.

Amusement park thrill rides must meet federal guidelines in their design, control and operation. As reported by WKYC Studios, the amusement ride manufacturer allegedly knew about a flaw in its design of the Fire Ball ride five years prior to the incident at the Ohio State Fair. Reportedly, the manufacturer allegedly ignored complaints about a tendency toward excessive corrosion and failed to advise ride operators about its dangerous effects.

Knowing that a product is defective, but making it available for the public’s use could result in additional damages. Injuries that occur because of a defective product may require a legal action for accident victims of their survivors to recover for relief.